Monday, November 19, 2018

Organic Chickens.Why do hens go broody? An holistic approach to brooding and hatching chicks. Part 1


Is there such a creature as a standard broody hen? Looking at how and why your hen does or doesn’t go broody will help you both to hatch and raise chicks successfully. Only one problem, once you’ve started, it’s very difficult to stop and Spring in the Garden will never be the same again without the clatter of tiny claws.

Comments

2 Responses to “Organic Chickens.Why do hens go broody? An holistic approach to brooding and hatching chicks. Part 1”
  1. Pavlovafowl says:

    Hi Dale,
    This illustrates the sort of problem I mean when I talk of removing broodies and keeping them on their own. It sounds like you have a really good broody but she’s confused and needs organising. At the moment, not laying herself, she is looking to find a clutch and she knows the hen house is the place. If you have some eggs ready I’d put her to sit, on her own in a cardboard box – I use our back bedroom. Stopping a hen this broody is hard and a good broody is worth her weight in gold!

  2. dalecalder2003 says:

    My Mottled Cochin who has been broody for around 2 months now is by herself in a cage , I’m trying to break her. She can’t be trusted to sit on eggs because she changes nests. It seems no matter which nest she is in one of the barred rocks will kick her out when she wants to lay her egg and the banty sits on the roost outside the nest and screams at her all the while she is in the nest. Let her out of the cage yesterday for an hour thought she was over it, but no, so she is back in the cage.